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Doctor Barry Sears

Dr. Sears Comments:

Money talks, and health usually walks.
Doctor Barry Sears

Dr. Sears Comments:

Aspirin is also an old drug that still works pretty well.  Niacin will reduce cholesterol levels with a lot of side-effects at levels required for cholesterol reduction.  Of course, the more you follow an anti-inflammatory diet, the less niacin you need as well as lower levels of statins (ideally zero in both cases) to bring cholesterol into normal levels.
Doctor Barry Sears

Dr. Sears Comments:

Rather than looking for super foods, you should be thinking of a super diet, one that reduces inflammation. 
Doctor Barry Sears

Dr. Sears Comments:

The problem with probiotics is the biological gauntlet they have to face going from the mouth to the colon.  This is why fecal transplants of probiotics are so much more effective in disease treatment.   
Doctor Barry Sears

Dr. Sears Comments:

Most parents are quite willing to leave their child's future to Big Food.  It's like letting a child to play in the street thinking he or she will never get hit by a car.
Doctor Barry Sears

Dr. Sears Comments:

Nonetheless, these keep reappearing year after year indicating it is very simple to lose weight but very difficult to keep it from returning.  To be successful, you have to control inflammation in the fat cells on a lifetime basis.
Doctor Barry Sears

Dr. Sears Comments:

One of the first uses of biotechnology to remove lactose from milk was making cheese and yogurt.  Buying lactose-free milk does the same thing besides gaining greater quality to high-quality protein needed to maintain satiety.
Doctor Barry Sears

Dr. Sears Comments:

I think I articulated those same concepts 20 years ago in “The Zone.”  It's nice to see that my concepts are now in fashion.
Doctor Barry Sears

Dr. Sears Comments:

Not surprisingly, the same is true for diabetes.  That's why if you have diabetes, you are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer's.
Doctor Barry Sears

Dr. Sears Comments:

 It's actually the balance of sodium to potassium that is key to controlling heart disease risk (O'Donnell MJ et al. "Urinary sodium and potassium excretion and risk of cardiovascular events.  JAMA 2011 Nov 23;306(20):2229-38")