Simple dietary changes ease diabetes risk

Since 1980 the number of individuals with diabetes in the United States has nearly tripled to an astonishing 17 million (1), leading physicians, researchers and pharmaceutical companies on the hunt for the most effective treatment options. A recent publication in Diabetes Care studied approximately 400 non-diabetic individuals at high cardiovascular risk and randomized them to one of three diets: Low-fat, Mediterranean with nuts, and Mediterranean with olive oil (2). Individuals were educated on the various diets but did not have to follow a certain calorie allotment or physical activity plan. After four years, the number of individuals with diabetes was 10.1 percent in the Mediterranean with olive oil group, 11 percent in the Mediterranean with nuts group and 17.9 percent in the low-fat group. Collectively when compared to the low-fat group, those following a Mediterranean diet were 52 percent less likely to develop diabetes. These results show the significant impact that simple dietary changes can have on diabetes risk reduction without having to dramatically change caloric intake or activity levels.

1. Diabetes Data and Trends. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/statistics/prev/national/figpersons.htm. Accessed: 10/14/2010

2. Salas-Salvadó J, Bulló M, Babio N, Martínez-González MA, Ibarrola-Jurado N, Basora J, Estruch R, Covas MI, Corella D, Arós F, Ruiz-Gutiérrez V, Ros E; For the PREDIMED Study investigators. Reduction in the Incidence of Type 2-Diabetes with the Mediterranean Diet: Results of the PREDIMED-Reus Nutrition Intervention Randomized Trial. Diabetes Care. 2010 Oct 13. [Epub ahead of print]

Nothing contained in this blog is intended to be instructional for medial diagnosis or treatment. If you have a medical concern or issue, please consult your personal physician immediately.

Time to get your Zzzzzzzzzzz’s

You shouldn’t have to wait until daylight savings ends to get that long-awaited extra hour of sleep, and a new study sheds light as to why you may wish to hit the hay a little sooner each night. A study just published in the Annals of Internal Medicine randomized 10 overweight or obese individuals to receive either 8.5 hours of sleep or 5.5 hours over a 14-day period of time (1). Each group consumed a moderate calorie-restricted diet. Although the duration and the number of individuals in the study was short and small, those who received 5.5 hours of sleep were 55 percent less likely to have any weight they lost coming from stored fat and 60 percent more likely to lose muscle mass. In addition, lack of sleep led to increased hunger and changes in metabolism. This makes perfect sense since it is known from previous studies that sleep deprivation increases both insulin levels (making it difficult to access stored body fat) and cortisol levels (that leads to breakdown of muscle mass). Who wouldn’t want a prescription to get more sleep, and wouldn’t it be a shame to work so hard to reduce your calorie intake only to find out you were cannibalizing your muscles rather than losing your stored body fat? So here’s to getting those Zzzzzzzzzzz’s.

1. Nedeltcheva, A.V, J.M. Kilkus , J. Imperial, D.A. Schoeller, P.D. Penev. Insufficient Sleep Undermines Dietary Efforts to Reduce Adiposity. Ann Intern Med 153:435-441 (2010)

Nothing contained in this blog is intended to be instructional for medial diagnosis or treatment. If you have a medical concern or issue, please consult your personal physician immediately.

Study: High-dose, high purity omega-3 oil lowers breast-cancer risk

Breast cancer accounts for more than 25 percent of all female cancers. Breast cancer is also strongly linked to obesity. This means as our obesity crisis accelerates, we can expect breast cancer rates to follow. The reason that breast cancer and obesity are linked is due to cellular inflammation caused by the diet.

Nothing contained in this blog is intended to be instructional for medial diagnosis or treatment. If you have a medical concern or issue, please consult your personal physician immediately.

For losing weight, exercise is good; diet is better

Here’s standard quote: “Losing weight can improve health and reduce many of the risk factors related to diabetes and heart disease.” Unfortunately, that’s not true. The correct statement is “losing excess body fat can improve health and reduce many of the risk factors related to diabetes and heart disease.”

It may seem like a minor difference, but it makes a world of difference. Weight loss could be due to water loss or cannibalization of lean body mass (muscles and organs), neither of which will lead to any health benefits.

If you want to reduce excess body fat, you have to lower insulin levels. How do you control that on a consistent basis? Remember the 80/20 rule. That means 80 percent of your insulin control will come from following a strict anti inflammatory diet, and 20 percent will come from increased physical activity.

This means the best exercise program can be undone by the wrong diet. Physical exercise has many important benefits, such as reducing the likelihood of diabetes and heart disease, improving sense of self-worth and hanging out with like-minded individuals.

Unfortunately, initial weight loss is not one of those benefits since research has demonstrated that exercise increases one’s appetite. This is why following a strict anti inflammatory diet is imperative if you are trying to lose weight by increasing your exercise. Another helpful hint is to increase your high purity omega-3 oil intake, as it has been demonstrated that fat loss is significantly increased when high purity omega-3 oil is used in combination with exercise.

On the other hand, after you reach your weight goals, the balance of diet and exercise to maintain your weight shifts to a 50/50 balance. Now exercise becomes an ideal way to maintain your weight as long as you continue to control insulin through the anti inflammatory diet.

Nothing contained in this blog is intended to be instructional for medial diagnosis or treatment. If you have a medical concern or issue, please consult your personal physician immediately.